The Finest Dishes Eater Editors Ate This Week, October 2020


The quantity of wonderful meals accessible in New York Metropolis is dizzying — even throughout a pandemic — but mediocre meals one way or the other hold worming their method into our lives. With Eater editors eating out typically a number of occasions a day, we do come throughout lots of standout dishes, and we don’t wish to hold any secrets and techniques. Test again weekly for the very best issues we ate this week — so you’ll be able to, too.

October 13

Two hands hold a red takeout tray from a diner with a hefty corndog perched on top. The dog is battered, fried, and covered with a zig-zag drizzle of sauce.

The wagyu corndog at Olmsted
Luke Fortney/Eater

Wagyu beef corndog at Olmsted

You is perhaps asking your self: What’s a restaurant that good doing in a photograph that dangerous? And also you’re proper to ask, solely nothing’s the place it belongs on the new Olmsted. Take this corndog, for instance, a hulking $16 mass that might by no means have appeared on the upscale restaurant’s menu earlier than the pandemic. Certain, it’s made with wagyu beef and, fantastic, the fried sage that adorns it’s extra fanciful than flavorful, however all advised that is nonetheless a really, excellent corndog. The large wagyu beef canine is held collectively utilizing three skewers and battered in a coating adequate to eat alone as a aspect. A number of dishes on the restaurant’s menu are prone to tug your arm, however give your internal (okay)id what it desires and order this one, as effectively. 659 Vanderbilt Avenue, between Park and Prospect Locations

A round of deep fried dough with luncheon wadded meat on top squiggled with a dark sauce.

Mortadella pizzette fritte at Kimika
Robert Sietsema/Eater

Mortadella pizzette fritte at Kimika

Is there any luncheon meat higher than mortadella? I feel not! And Japanese-Italian restaurant Kimika options it on one of many fried pizzas that anchor its relatively uncommon menu. The crust is first fried to a golden brown, wadded with pistachio-dotted mortadella earlier than it cools, and warmed barely as a darkish miso sauce with a hint of sweetness is squiggled throughout its pink uncovered surfaces. A hint of warmth stays because the pizza ($19) is dropped at the desk and piece after piece is quickly torn off and hoisted mouthward. 40 Kenmare Road at Elizabeth Road, Nolita — Robert Sietsema, senior critic

A sandwich cut in half with pieces of meat falling out of it all placed on a paper wrapping

Pastrami sandwich at Katz’s Deli
Tanay Warerkar/Eater

Pastrami sandwich at Katz’s Deli

I’ve been in New York for the previous 12 years however had by no means managed to take a look at Katz’s Deli — till this previous weekend. With all of the hype round this iconic sandwich, I used to be nearly sure I wouldn’t prefer it all that a lot. I’m joyful to report, nevertheless, that the hype is totally justified. Sure, it’s almost unattainable to eat this overflowing sandwich by your self, so seize a good friend — or higher but, save the opposite half for later within the day. The pastrami is fatty and tender and virtually melts in your mouth, and the sharp yellow mustard packs a punch and balances all that richness. The rye bread ties all the weather collectively, however not neatly I’d add, so count on a messy affair throughout. 205 E Houston Road, at Ludlow Road — Tanay Warerkar, reporter

Hen thighs at Market Bistro

Each indoor and outside tables stay largely packed at this contemporary Jericho staple, positioned proper by the historic Milleridge Inn, however the Sutton household nonetheless sticks to takeout-only. The resident cooks just lately added a braised hen thigh dish ($26) to the menu, which within reason avant-garde by Lengthy Island requirements, the place most patrons count on their poultry to be roasted. A beneficiant bathtub of tomato sauce features as tart counterpoint to the wealthy, bone-in meat, whereas black olives and pancetta impart various levels of umami and brine. Toast a number of slices of bread at residence to sop up all of the drippings, and there’s your gentle Saturday night time dinner. 519 N Broadway, Jericho, Lengthy Island — Ryan Sutton, chief critic


October 5

A wooden table with a few dishes place on it each containing food

Masala lamb burger (middle) at Rahi
Tanay Warerkar/Eater

Masala lamb burger at Rahi

I not often — if ever — would choose to get a burger at brunch, however this lamb burger ($17) burger at Rahi actually known as out to me on a latest outing. And I used to be so glad I did. The lamb was melt-in-your-mouth tender and bursting with taste, with notably robust hits of crushed coriander seeds, which made it all of the extra interesting to me. The mint chutney drizzled on high is a pleasant, herby complement to the wealthy burger, and the spicy chips that come together with the burger pack a crispy punch. I additionally advocate getting the candy and salty coconut utthapam waffles ($18) and the tangy artichoke chaat ($15), however the burger notably stood out to me in Rahi’s top-notch brunch menu. 28 Greenwich Ave., close to Perry Road, Greenwich VillageTanay Warerkar, reporter

A white cone of french fries with ketchup, mayo, and raw chopped onions on top.

French fries with especial sauce at Pommes Frites
Robert Sietsema/Eater

French fries with especial sauce at Pommes Frites

Certain you’ll be able to pay a little bit additional at Belgian fry specialist Pommes Frites and have your alternative of dozens upon dozens of exotic-sounding sauces. Nevertheless it’s the free ones I at all times go for, particularly the one known as especial. On a paper cone of lovely twice-fried french fries are squirted portions of thick mayo and ketchup, then additional heaped with chopped white onions. The trick is to get a mix of those toppings on each fry as you hoist it mouthward. Proven is the small measurement, which is able to set you again $6.25, and is sufficient fries for anybody. 128 Macdougal Road, between Minetta Lane and West third Road, Greenwich Village — Robert Sietsema, senior critic

A glazed brioche doughnut rests on a napkin and a yellow piece of parchment paper. In the background, a pair of jeans is visible.

Purple chile doughnut at Ursula
Luke Fortney/Eater

Purple chile doughnut at Ursula

There’s a golden 30-minute window at Ursula — between 11:30 a.m. and 12 p.m. — during which prospects can order from each the restaurant’s breakfast and lunch menus. (Suppose: poblano rellenos, sopaipillas, chorizo breakfast burritos, and housemade pastelitos multi function sitting.) It’s a technique I extremely advocate when visiting the Crown Heights newcomer for the primary time, and one which I wasn’t capable of make occur on my most up-to-date go to to the restaurant. As an alternative, I sampled a number of gadgets from its breakfast menu, together with a standout chorizo breakfast burrito ($10) and this picturesque purple chile doughnut. The pastry — really useful by each of the employees within the restaurant that morning — didn’t disappoint, its gentle and ethereal inside speckled with purple chiles. 724 Sterling Place, on the nook of Bedford Avenue — Luke Fortney, reporter

A sesame bagel with cream cheese at Edith’s
Amanda Kludt

Chocolate Sesame Twist + Sesame Bagel at Edith’s

I went to the Edith’s pop-up at Paulie Gee’s for the bagels, which have been nice, however was in the end received over by the obscene sesame and chocolate twist. It’s an (excuse me) phallic-looking pastry made from twisted gentle challah dotted with two kinds of chocolate and coated in a candy tahini glaze and sprinkled with sesame seeds. Only a thrilling combo. It’s a kind of confections the place you inform your self you’re simply going to strive a style after which minutes later the entire thing is gone. I additionally advocate the bagels, simply word that a number of the gadgets on the menu — the Edith’s X Paulie Gee’s pizza bagels, the honey schnecken — promote out early and have been already gone about an hour and a half into service on Sunday. 60 Greenpoint Ave., close to Franklin St., Greenpoint — Amanda Kludt, editor in chief

Egg Sandwich at Sullivan Road Bakery

Sullivan Road in Hell’s Kitchen was a staple Sutton pre-pandemic breakfast spot. My typical transfer was two slices of tomato pizza — a number of the city’s best — and a cup of espresso. Once in a while, nevertheless, I’d seize this loopy good BEC: room temperature scrambled eggs on lemony brioche with crisped prosciutto. Factor is, the $5 sandwich was solely snack-sized, one thing meant to be paired with different pastries. However so the story goes that on my most up-to-date go to, the sandwich — this one made with gentle boiled eggs — was as large as a bodega BEC, that means it constituted a correct breakfast all by itself. Price: $7. I’ll be having extra of those. 533 West forty seventh Road between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues — Ryan Sutton, chief critic





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